Dogs out at Ian Narev’s Commonwealth Bank boardroom

Ian Narev CEO of the Commonwealth Bank appeared before the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Economics Review of ‘s Four Major Banks at Parliament House in Canberra on Tuesday 4 October 2016. Photo: Andrew Meares Photo: Andrew MearesIan Narev’s Commonwealth Bank has worn a mountain of criticism over its financial planning and CommInsure scandals, but it is good to hear stories emerging of Narev’s willingness to personally meet victims even while the CommInsure storm was still raging.
SuZhou Night Recruitment

CBD was told of how Narev agreed to meet with one of the bank’s former customer services representatives, Matthew Attwater, in May last year.

For those who remember back to Fairfax Media reports at the time, Attwater was told to “ill-health retire” in 2013. But when Mr Attwater tried to claim on the CommInsure total and permanent disability insurance he held through his CBA-specialist super fund his application was refused.

Attwater took up the bank CEO’s offer of an apology in person.

And he brought a friend – Jack the chihuahua – who was carried into the bank’s boardroom in his own handbag.

It’s the first time that a dog has been allowed into the bank’s boardroom, quipped Narev, who was the perfect host CBD is told.

Jack even got to sit on Ian’s lap and did not disgrace himself, CBD is told. Foreign affairs

As NSW gaming authorities conduct a probity check on James Packer – ahead of his planned return to the Crown Resorts board – the news from overseas is not getting any better for the billionaire casino mogul.

An Israeli investigation into lavish gift giving to its Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, has been extended as the police have been unable to interview key figures including Packer, according to reports from Israel.

Reports state the graft investigation – which was meant to be completed by now – will continue for another two months as some judicial inquiries abroad still haven’t been carried out. This includes setting a date to question the globe-trotting Packer.

Packer’s local representatives declined to comment on the reports, and there is no suggestion of wrongdoing on his part.

The long-running investigation by Israeli authorities into the lavish lifestyle enjoyed by Netanyahu’s family, and the alleged benefactors like Packer who have funded the acquisition of champagne, cigars, fine clothes and jewellery.

In the case of Packer, this reportedly includes luxury holidays and hotels for the PM’s family, as well as free tickets to concerts given by his then fiancee – Mariah Carey.

Israeli state employees and elected officials are forbidden from accepting gifts, but Netanyahu has characterised the items in question as personal gifts from friends.

Packer has a home in Tel Aviv which has the Netanyahu family as a neighbour – as well as long-time Packer family friend – Hollywood mogul Arnon Milchan.

“Spending time with Arnon and Prime Minister Netanyahu has been an amazing eye-opener for me and it reinforces how lucky we all are in ,” Packer told The Daily Telegraph in 2015.

According to earlier reports, Milchan recruited Packer to help fund the gift giving after tiring of the demands from the Netanyahu family.

The reports – from what has been a heavily leaked investigation – state that Netanyahu was questioned by police investigators for a fourth time, last week.

It comes on top of Packer’s China woes with the ongoing detention of 14 of Crown’s staff. The China crisis triggered a sweeping restructure of his gambling empire and a retreat to the safer shores of . Vita low ah

Shares of Maxine Horne’s Vita Group took a tumble on Tuesday after Fairfax Media reported on a leaked internal Telstra document which revealed the telco giant is considering taking back control of some of its store network – setting up a potential clash with retail partners like Vita.

Vita replied in an ASX statement saying it has an agreement with Telstra in place until 2020. It obviously didn’t impress the markets which sent the share price crashing more than 20 per cent to a low of $2.50 before closing at $2.54.

Keep in mind that the market should not have been too surprised by this. The stock was trading at $4.73 last October when news leaked of confidential negotiations about the “remuneration construct” between Telstra and Fone Zone.

Luckily for Horne, her investment diversification strategy saw her sell $50 million of stock in September last year at $4.95 a pop.

Not that she doesn’t love love the team at Vita of course. She still owns 25 million shares and is the company’s largest shareholder. Leading the Vita Group, a company that prides itself on its ability to execute, as you would imagine I really like this one ???? pic.twitter苏州夜总会招聘/TAhqHT89jZ??? Maxine Horne (@vitachief) March 15, 2017 Continue reading

World first for A-League on Friday

Will it bring an end to all of football’s controversial decisions?
SuZhou Night Recruitment

It’s unlikely, as anyone who watches Test cricket where rows over the Decision Review System knows.

But it’s not often that the A-League can win plaudits for being a global leader, as it will this Friday night when it becomes the first top-tier competition in the world to trial the Video Assistant Referee System (VARS) in a league match.

The use of technology should at least alleviate some of the splenetic criticism directed at referees from fans.

And, as ‘s director of referees, Ben Williams points out, being able to take counsel from colleagues watching incidents in replay on a video screen could save match officials from “those three or four sleepless night after a game when they are going over in their mind how they might have made a howler.”

Officials from the sport’s governing body, FIFA, and soccer’s law-making body, the International Football Association Board (IFAB) will be at AAMI Park to watch Melbourne City try to resurrect their finals hopes when they play Adelaide United in this historic game.

The system has been trialled in a number of games in various competitions – the second-tier and MLS Cup matches in the United States, international friendlies last week, the Club World Cup at the end of last year – but the FFA is happy to be a groundbreaker in utilising it in a league match for competition points.

It is similar to that used in rugby, rugby league and cricket, where “eyes in the sky” (in this initial case a cramped room on the second level at AAMI Park) can review controversial or disputed decisions and have them overturned if there is an obvious error.

The FFA will use the technology in the last two games of the regular season, then throughout the finals.

If all goes well, and FIFA and the IFAB observers are happy with its implementation in (and in other leagues, which are due to introduce it sooner rather than later), VARs will be in action at all A-League fixtures next season.

So how does it work?

‘s refereeing boss, Williams, says the underlying principle behind using VARs is to “improve the game” and it can only be pressed into service to help match officials in four key areas.

1. Goal /no-goal decisions.

2. Penalty/no-penalty decisions.

3. Direct red cards (not second yellow cards).

4. Mistaken identity.

In all these situations, the VAR is used after the referee has made a decision (including allowing play to continue), or if a serious incident is not seen by match officials.

“We want minimum interference for maximum benefit. We will not be re-refereeing the game,” Williams stressed at a media briefing on Tuesday.

“Only if the decision is clearly wrong will the video referee intervene.”

Williams and the head of the A-League, Greg O’Rourke, said they were very confident that sufficient trials and practice had been conducted to ensure the system works smoothly.

There had been 26 live match trials, and tests had also been conducted at every venue, said Williams.

Nine current and former referees, the latter including Strebre Delovksi and Craig Zetter, have been instructed in the skills required to be video adjudicators.

“The referees have responded very positively … they see it as an opportunity to get out of a jam,” Williams said.

“They have the chance to see a replay and, if it’s a clear error, have that decision corrected. They know they have a safety net.

“But they will not be changing the way they referee the game. They will make a decision and referee the game as if there were no Video Assistant Referee there.”

Some fear that the technology intrusion will over-complicate matters and games could stretch beyond the 90 minutes with a few extra minutes of stoppage time each half.

Williams said that is unlikely, pointing out that in 12 trials of A-League games there had only been 24 key match decisions, with only three involving the kind of errors that would have needed to be changed.

“If there is doubt we are generally not going to get involved. We want to use it rarely.”

Still, some players, coaches and fans will want to claim all manner of issues should be reviewed.

Williams says he and his team have anticipated dealing with what he diplomatically calls “misunderstandings of the protocols” – if protagonists wanted “soft penalties” or incidents outside the four areas of review to be looked at.

The system is likely to be tried at the Confederations Cup later this year, and possibly used in next year’s World Cup.

HOLD THAT CALL

The sort of decisions which might be subject to VAR scrutiny.

1) Sydney defender Michael Zullo’s handball in the derby against Western Sydney Wanderers. Obvious error, penalty would have been awarded.

2) Nicolas Colazo’s goal for Melbourne City v Adelaide. Referee blew his whistle when he saw assistant’s flag had been wrongly raised for offside an instant before Colazo shot for goal. Had referee not blown to stop play, the incident would have been reviewed and a goal likely been given. Officials hope assistants will in future be slower to raise flag, knowing that any close call can be re-examined.

3) Diego Castro’s theatrical tumble for Perth v Adelaide last weekend. Decision would not have been changed, because there had been contact, however, slight, and it was not an obvious error.

Continue reading

Chinan interest rates unchanged in April after Reserve Bank decision

RBA governor Philip Lowe is expected to address the question of house prices on Monday night in an unusual televised address to an RBA board dinner in Melbourne. Photo: Henry ZwartzThe Reserve Bank of has held the cash rate steady at 1.5 per cent for the 12th consecutive month amid growing pressure for it to increase rates to contain soaring house prices.
SuZhou Night Recruitment

The futures market is pricing in no change in ratesuntil late 2018, when there will be an increase.

In the year to March 31,Sydney home prices climbed 18.9 per cent, Melbourne prices 15.9 per cent and the average of capital city prices 12.9 per cent.

In the past week, both then Prudential Regulation Authority and the n Securities and Investments Commission have announced tighter rules and increased supervisionof banks’ lending to investors in an effort to contain the growth in lending to investors to 10 per cent.

RBAgovernor Philip Lowe is expected to address the question of house prices on Monday night in an unusual televised address to an RBAboard dinner in Melbourne.

CoreLogic head of research Tim Lawless saidthe governor’s statementmade clear that the board had been stuck “between a rock and hard place”.

“They aren’t likely to push rates higher just to quell housing market exuberance; doing so could push inflation lower and the n dollar higher as well as cancel out some of the much-needed stimulus that many sectors of the economy are benefiting from,” he said.

“On the other hand, the bank would be loath to push rates lower out of concern for adding further fuel to an already overheated housing market.

“With the cash rate likely to remain on hold, at least for the remainder of the year, it’s looking increasingly like other factors will be necessary to undertake the heavy lifting required to bring about a housing market slowdown. Mortgage rates have been rising despite the steady cash rate, which will act as a disincentive to market demand.”

Ahead of the RBA announcement, the n dollar was buying US76.04¢.

Continue reading

Flashback Friday: University of Newcastle graduationsphotos

Flashback Friday: University of Newcastle graduations | photos University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Picture Max Mason-Hubers
SuZhou Night Recruitment

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle.

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

A marching band leading graduates on Merewether Street. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle parade through the city of Newcastle. Image shows the parade on King street. Picture: Darren Pateman

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduation parade through the city of Newcastle. Image shows the n Army Marching band leads the parade. Picture: Darren Pateman

University of Newcastle graduation parade through the city of Newcastle. Image shows the n Army Marching band leads the parade. Picture: Darren Pateman

University of Newcastle parade through the city of Newcastle. Image shows the parade on King street. Picture: Darren Pateman

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. A band playing in Wheeler place sheltering from the sun under umbrellas.Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Graduates on Auckland Street. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Graduates marching City Hall on King Street.Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Graduates on King Street. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Graduates on King Street. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Graduates turning onto Auckland Street from Hunter Street. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates march from Honeysuckle to Wheeler Place. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates march from Honeysuckle to Wheeler Place. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates march from Honeysuckle to Wheeler Place. Samantha McGaughey, waving to camera. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates march from Honeysuckle to Wheeler Place. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates march from Honeysuckle to Wheeler Place. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates march from Honeysuckle to Wheeler Place. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates march from Honeysuckle to Wheeler Place. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates march from Honeysuckle to Wheeler Place. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates march from Honeysuckle to Wheeler Place. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates march from Honeysuckle to Wheeler Place. Julia Moore. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates march from Honeysuckle to Wheeler Place. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates march from Honeysuckle to Wheeler Place. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates march from Honeysuckle to Wheeler Place. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates march from Honeysuckle to Wheeler Place. From left, Fairuz Hana Mod Ghazi, Nur Sakinah Zulkifli, Nuryl Izzati Nordin. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. A band playing in Wheeler place sheltering from the sun under umbrellas. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Pic shows David Enderby of Boat Harbour, Sheree Enderby of Boat Harbour and Phillip Enderby of Speers Point posing for a Selfie in Wheeler Place. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Family and friends cheering graduates as the march into Wheeler Place. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Picture Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Picture Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Picture Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Graduates at the start of the march. Picture Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Graduates at the start of the march. Picture Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Friends and relatives cheering and photographing as graduates walking past on Hunter Street. Picture Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Picture Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Picture Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Picture Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Picture Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Picture Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Picture Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Picture Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Picture Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Max Greive and Bronwyn Greive of Mayfield outside Civic Theatre. Picture Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. An elder man in his robes taking refuge from the heat in the foyer of Civic Theatre. Picture Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Carol Stott, left, with daughter Samantha Stott, right. Picture Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Picture Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. The marching band playing as graduates file into Wheeler Place. Picture Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

University of Newcastle graduates celebratory march in downtown Newcastle. Dr. Shalini Rajan and her father Rajan Thurairatnam posing for a photograph in Wheeler Place. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

TweetFacebook University of Newcastle April graduationsPictures: Fairfax archives and InstagramAs this year’s graduates prepare for the next stage in their lives, we celebrate our past graduates.

Continue reading

Geoffrey Michael Strong pleads guilty to causing workmate Glenn Canning’s death at Sandgate

Truck driver caused death Geoffrey Strong.
SuZhou Night Recruitment

Scene of an accident at the Crawfords Freightlines premesis on Old Maitland Rd Sandgate where a man died after an incident where a truck and forklift collided. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Scene of an accident at the Crawfords Freightlines premesis on Old Maitland Rd Sandgate where a man died after an incident where a truck and forklift collided. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Scene of an accident at the Crawfords Freightlines premesis on Old Maitland Rd Sandgate where a man died after an incident where a truck and forklift collided. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Scene of an accident at the Crawfords Freightlines premesis on Old Maitland Rd Sandgate where a man died after an incident where a truck and forklift collided. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Scene of an accident at the Crawfords Freightlines premesis on Old Maitland Rd Sandgate where a man died after an incident where a truck and forklift collided. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Scene of an accident at the Crawfords Freightlines premesis on Old Maitland Rd Sandgate where a man died after an incident where a truck and forklift collided. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Scene of an accident at the Crawfords Freightlines premesis on Old Maitland Rd Sandgate where a man died after an incident where a truck and forklift collided. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

TweetFacebook Scene of an accident at the Crawfords Freightlines premesis on Old Maitland Rd Sandgate where a man died after an incident where a truck and forklift collided. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers IT was a minor collision between a truck and forklift in the yard of a Sandgate transport company that should have ended with an apology and a repair bill.

Instead, the truck driver, Geoffrey Michael Strong, and his co-worker on the forklift, Glenn Alan Canning, became involved in a heated argument, before Strong reached up and punched Mr Canning four times in the head.

Mr Canning slumped forward in the seat and was pronounced dead before paramedics could get him to hospital.Strong was charged with manslaughter, but on Tuesday, on what would have been the second day of a trial in Newcastle District Court, he pleaded guilty to the alternative charge of assault causing death.

The offence falls under the state’s new “one-punch” laws, passed in 2014 after several high-profile “coward punch” cases in Sydney, and carries a maximum penalty of 20 years in jail.

Strong, who remains on conditional bail, will be sentenced in June.

Strong and Mr Canning were both working in the yard atCrawfords Freightlines on August 4, 2015, when the collision occurred about 2.40pm, according to a statement of agreed facts.

A short time later, the pair argued and traded obscenities before Strong walked around the front of his prime mover to where Mr Canning was still sitting in his forklift.

He reached up and punched Mr Canning four times in the head with his right fist.

During his interview with detectives, Strong said: “I thought he was going to hit me because of a sudden aggressive move toward me…so I grabbed him and gave him four quick punches. “There was no full-on aggression, there was no intent to cause anything like this.”

Continue reading

WordPress theme: Kippis 1.15